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Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods at CWRU

Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods at CWRU

The mission of the PRCHN is to foster partnerships within urban neighborhoods to develop, test and implement effective and sustainable strategies and interventions in preventing and reducing the burden of chronic disease. We do this by collaborating with neighborhood residents, leaders and community organizations in Greater Cleveland to address the significant environmental and lifestyle issues that serve as barriers to good health.Housed in the School of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, the PRCHN is embarking on research that's truly in collaboration with neighborhoods impacted by poverty and chronic health conditions. This is possible in part through partnerships with: city and county health organizations, the Network of Community Advisors (NOCA), and four other schools at Case.The Center was built on the Center for Health Promotion Research (CHPR), also housed at Case Western Reserve University. The CHPR was founded in 2000 and was led by the Director of the PRCHN, Elaine A. Borawski, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. In 2010 the CHPR was absorbed into the PRCHN, along with several of its signature projects. Control and Prevention (CDC) as part of its Prevention Research Centers (PRC) program, which is now entering its 26th year and involves 37 centers in total. The primary aim of the PRC Network is to reduce the rate of chronic disease in the most threatened populations across the U.S. Chronic diseases (such as heart disease, asthma, and diabetes) account for70% of all deaths and are responsible for 75% of the nation's skyrocketing healthcare costs, so this program reflects a critical societal concern (CDC, 2009. OMB, 2008). Due in part to the decline of industry in recent decades, Cleveland often ranks among the poorest and most unhealthy populations in the country (American Community Survey, 2004. CDC BRFSS, 2006).

Phone
216-368-1918